Canadians in Space, STS-100

Endeavour and its crew of seven glided to a landing at Edwards Air Force Base in California May 1, touching down at 12:11 p.m. EDT, concluding a successful mission to install CANADARM2 on the International Space Station, and a journey of more than 7,840,000 kms.

Check out Mission Updates below.

Last updated: Friday, July 12, 2002 04:24 PM

Courtesy Canadian Space Agency
© Canadian Space Agency 2001
http://www.space.gc.ca

The International Space Station is the largest science and technology project in the history of humanity, a symbol of international cooperation and the joint effort of the world's leading industrialized nations. The five key partners are Canada, the United States, Russia, Japan and the European Space Agency (composed of eleven European nations). Construction began in late 1998 with launches of the first two components - the Russian module Zarya and the US module Unity. Several more elements have since been installed, including the US Science Lab, Destiny. Construction is expected to continue until 2006, requiring a total of some 50 space flights.

Canada has been involved from the outset and its role evolved naturally from its participation in the Space Shuttle program and the development of the Canadarm, the Shuttle's robot arm. Without the use of Canadian robotic technologies, the International Space Station simply could not be built.

Canada's major contribution to ISS is the Mobile Servicing System (MSS). The first of the three MSS components, the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) is being delivered and installed during this mission, STS-100. SSRMS will allow construction of the Space Station to progress. This robotic system will play a key role in space station assembly and maintenance, moving equipment and supplies around the station, supporting astronauts working in space and servicing instruments and other payloads attached to the space station.

The Canadian Space Agency web site will host daily online student activities during the mission, STS-100. Curriculum-linked lesson plans and assessment tools that are relevant to the mission and beyond can be accessed from the YES I Can! Science database from the buttons below. Teachers are invited to use these resources with their students in exploring the science "at the heart of innovation in space".

YES I Can! Science

Grade 3: Materials and Structures

Grade 5: Forces and Simple Machines; Meeting Basic Needs and Maintaining a Healthy Body; Properties and Changes of Materials

Grade 6: Electricity, Space

Grade 7: Heat; Interactions within Ecosystems

Grade 8: Water Systems; Cells, Tissues, Organs and Systems

Grade 9: Characteristics of Electricity; Space Exploration

Grade 10: Motion

Grades 11/12: Energy and Momentum; Fields; Force, Motion and Work


MISSION UPDATES


Wake-up calls are a long-standing tradition of the NASA program. Each day during the mission, flight controllers in the Mission Control Center will greet the crew with an appropriate musical interlude. The "wake-up" voice you hear is that of Canadian Astronaut Steve MacLean.
Daily Videos: Crew Activity Reports
05/01/01
1:00 p.m. EDT
Endeavour and its crew of seven glided to a landing at Edwards Air Force Base in California today, touching down at 12:11 p.m. EDT, concluding a successful mission to install a new-generation robotic arm on the International Space Station, and a journey of more than 7,840,000 kms. See full report.
05/01/01
6:00 a.m. EDT

With the Kennedy Space Center reporting cloud cover, showers and gusty winds and with forecasters calling for more of the same today and tomorrow, flight controllers began focusing on bringing Endeavour home to a landing at Edwards Air Force Base later today. See full report.

04/30/01
5:00 p.m. EDT
Weather permitting, Endeavour and its crew of seven will return to the Kennedy Space Center tomorrow morning, concluding a successful mission to install a new-generation robotic arm on the International Space Station, and a journey of more than 7,680,000 kms. See full report.
04/30/01
5:00 a.m. EDT
Endeavour's crewmembers accomplished all of their major mission goals during the eight days the shuttle was docked to the space station and are now on their way home. They will spend today preparing for return to Earth. Landing is scheduled for 9:04 a.m. EDT Tuesday at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. All seven crewmembers are also scheduled to participate in a press conference with media in the U.S., Canada and Italy at 11:01 a.m. See full report.
04/29/01
5:00 p.m. EDT
As Pilot Jeff Ashby backed slowly away from the International Space Station at 1:34 p.m. EDT today, Commander Kent Rominger and Expedition Two flight engineer Susan Helms exchanged final wishes for Endeavour's planned return to Earth, and a continued safe journey for the station crew. Once Endeavour was at a distance of 137 meters from the station, Ashby initiated a three-quarter circle flyaround of the station as Mission Specialist Yuri Lonchakov activated a large-format IMAX camera in Endeavour's payload bay to photograph the station. See full report.
04/29/01
1:35 p.m. EDT
The Expedition Two and STS-100 crews said goodbye and closed the hatches between the International Space Station and Space Shuttle Endeavour for the final time this morning. Endeavour undocked from the station at 1:34 p.m. EDT. Meanwhile, the computer problems that have plagued the station are getting better. Three command and control computers are now online. Full report this evening.
04/29/01
6:00 a.m. EDT
Endeavour's crew and the crew of the International Space Station will say farewell today, ending an eight-day visit by the shuttle that saw a new robotic arm, Canadarm2 and more than 5000 kgs. of supplies and equipment delivered to the complex, including two scientific experiment racks for the U.S. laboratory Destiny. See full report.
04/28/01
9:30 p.m. EDT
A Canadian "handshake in space" occurred at 5:02 p.m EDT today. The successful exchange of the pallet was the last remaining major objective of the mission to be accomplished and could pave the way for Endeavour to undock from the station Sunday morning, if computers on board can be placed in a stable configuration overnight. See full report.
04/28/01
6:30 p.m. EDT
The International Space Station's new robotic arm, Canadarm2, passed another test today when it handed the Spacelab pallet over to Space Shuttle Endeavour's robotic arm at 5:02 p.m. EDT. It is the first time that two robotic arms have worked together in space. Expedition Two Flight Engineer Susan Helms, with the assistance of Flight Engineer Jim Voss, controlled the station's arm. The shuttle's arm was controlled by STS-100 Mission Specialist Chris Hadfield. He was assisted by Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski. Just moments ago, Hadfield finished placing the pallet back into Endeavour's payload bay for its return to Earth. Complete report later this evening.
04/28/01
1:45 p.m. EDT
The computer systems onboard the ISS have been sufficiently restored to give the crew the go-ahead for the robotic handoff of the storage pallett, so that it may be stowed aboard the shuttle for a return to Earth. The joint crew press conference, during which the 10 astronauts and cosmonauts were to field questions from U.S., Canadian and European media, has been cancelled for today and will be rescheduled for tomorrow.
04/28/01
10:50 a.m. EDT
The robotic handoff of the storage pallett has been delayed until recovery of the station's backup computers is complete. Ground controllers have reloaded software to one of the backup computers and have successfully brought it back online. The primary computer onboard continues to function with no problems in spite of a memory error message forty-five minutes ago. Ground controllers are evaluating this message and working to bring the second backup computer online.
04/28/01
7:30 a.m. EDT
The primary computer aboard the International Space Station continued to work well through the night, but flight controllers continued to encounter difficulties recovering the station's backup computers. Even if backup computers are not yet on line, the crew may be given a go today to use the station's robotic arm in an abbreviated manoeuver to hand a carrier pallet to Endeavour's arm so that it may be stowed aboard the shuttle for a return to Earth. See full report.
04/27/01
8:00 p.m. EDT
Work to recover the command and control computers continued throughout the day today, with good progress reported. With the one operational C&C computer, and Susan Helms at the ready with a back-up laptop computer in Unity, the crew was given a "go" to begin the undocking procedure for the Italian Space Agency-provided Raffaello logistics module about 3:20 p.m. today. See full report.
04/27/01
4:30 p.m. EDT
The STS-100 crew used Space Shuttle Endeavour's robot arm to detach the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module from the International Space Station and return it to the orbiter's payload bay. STS-100 Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski controlled the robot arm. He was assisted by Mission Specialist and Italian Astronaut Umberto Guidoni. Raffaello, which was built by the Italian Space Agency, is filled with trash and unneeded items and will return to Earth with Endeavour.
04/27/01
6:30 a.m. EDT
Of the three station command and control computers, one is on line and fully functional, providing full computer operations aboard the station. The other two, which should serve as backups to the primary computer, are off-line. Today's activities are planned to bring them on line as well. Managers have added an extra day to Endeavour's mission and are now planning to have the shuttle remain docked to the station until Sunday with a landing on Tuesday. See full report.
04/26/01
9:30 p.m. EDT
As flight controllers continued to troubleshoot computer systems on board the International Space Station (ISS), the ten crewmembers were told late today they would spend some bonus time together, after mission managers requested an additional two days of docked operations to allow ground teams to recover the use of command computers in the Destiny laboratory and to complete joint activities. See full report.
04/26/01
10:30 a.m. EDT
The station command and control computer brought on line early this morning has continued to be fully functional and operate normally throughout the day. Controllers are working to bring another such computer online as a backup system later today. See full report.
04/26/01
6:30 a.m. EDT
Good news greeted space station flight controllers this morning when, shortly after awakening, Expedtion Two flight engineer Susan Helms reported that the International Space Station computer systems may be returning to normal. Helms performed a series of troubleshooting steps that restored the ground's ability to monitor and send commands to the station's U.S. systems. See full report.
04/25/01
9:30 p.m. EDT
Troubleshooting efforts designed to restore full capability to the International Space Station's three redundant command and control computers continue in Mission Control. See full report.
04/25/01
5:00 a.m. EDT
The Station's new robotic arm, Canadarm2, truly will extend the reach of humans in space today when it hands the 1360-kilogram pallet delivering it to space to the shuttle's robotic arm for transport back to Earth. In an historic moment, two generations of Canadian robotic arms will work together in a move that has been dubbed the first robotic "handshake" in space. The three-hour task is set to begin about 7 a.m. See full report.
04/24/01
7:30 p.m. EDT
Endeavour's two space walkers -- Canadian Chris Hadfield and American Scott Parazynski-- worked as space-age electricians today, completing connections that allowed the new International Space Station robotic arm to operate from a new base on the outside of the Destiny science lab. See full report.
04/24/01
10:30 a.m. EDT
STS-100's second space walk is under way. Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield and Scott Parazynski began the space walk at 8:34 a.m. EDT. The objectives for the two space walkers include rewiring the base of the International Space Station's newly installed Canadarm2, removing a communications antenna from Unity and mounting a spare electrical converter unit on a stowage platform on Destiny for future station use. The space walk is slated to last about 6 hours and 25 minutes and end around 3 p.m. Following the conclusion of the space walk, the hatches between the station and the shuttle will be reopened and joint operations with the Expedition Two crew will resume.
04/24/01
5:00 a.m. EDT
Chris Hadfield and Scott Parazynski plan to conduct the second Extravehicular Activity of this mission beginning about 9 a.m. EDT. The first order of business for the veteran spacewalkers will be to connect power, computer and video cables to the Power and Data Grapple Fixture on the side of the station's Destiny laboratory. See full report.
04/23/01
7:00 p.m. EDT
This morning, Expedition Two Flight Engineers Jim Voss and Susan Helms sent commands to the International Space Station's new robotic arm, Canadarm2 - the Space Station Remote Manipulator System - telling it to walk off its pallet and attach itself to a grapple fixture on the U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module. The manoeuver, which began at 7:13 a.m. EDT, was a success. See full report.
04/23/01
6:00 a.m. EDT
At 5:25 a.m. EDT today, the Expedition Two crew welcomed the seven STS-100 crewmembers onboard the International Space Station.
04/23/01
4:00 a.m. EDT
The 10 astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the International Space Station and the docked shuttle Endeavour are beginning a day that will see the first opening of hatches linking the two spacecraft. Highlights will include an impressive first step by the station's new Canadarm2. See full report.
04/22/01
4:30 p.m. EDT
Endeavour's astronauts extended the reach of the International Space Station today, successfully installing the 17 metre long Canadian-built robotic arm. "This is a spectacular view," said Hadfield as he exited the hatch and floated into space. Mission Control Houston recognized the importance of today's activities sending up a congratulatory message from Canadian Astronaut Steve MacLean and playing the Canadian anthem, before the two space walkers, Chris Hadfield and Scott Parazynski, floated back into Endeavour. See full report.
04/22/01
4:00 a.m. EDT
Canadian Chris Hadfield and the other Endeavour crew members are preparing for the first of two planned spacewalks set to begin about 7:20 this morning to install the orbiting outpost's Canadian built robotic arm. See full report.
04/21/01
4:30 p.m. EDT
Endeavour gently docked with the International Space Station this morning. See full report.
04/21/01
4:00 a.m. EDT
Space Shuttle Endeavour and its seven crewmembers began rendezvous preparations shortly after 4 a.m. EDT today, which should culminate in an 9:32 a.m. docking to the International Space Station. See full report.
04/20/01
6:30 p.m. EDT
The day on orbit was one of preparations as Endeavour's seven astronauts got ready for tomorrow morning's scheduled arrival at the International Space Station. See full report.
04/20/01
7:00 a.m. EDT
Major systems aboard Endeavour and the International Space Station continue to function well. See full report.
04/19/01
4:30 p.m. EDT
Endeavour is circling the Earth in excellent shape. See full report.
04/19/01
2:52 p.m. EDT
The Space Shuttle Endeavour blasted off on cue at 2:41 EDT, this afternoon from the Kennedy Space Centre in Florida. Weather conditions were perfect as the shuttle lifted off. Endeavour is slated to dock with the station Saturday at 9:36 a.m. EDT.

04/17/01

Space Shuttle Endeavour is in excellent health as final preparations are made for launch. Weather officials indicate only a 10 percent chance that weather could prohibit Thursday's launch.
04/16/01 STS-100 Flight Crew, including Canadian Space Agency Astronaut Chris Hadfield, arrived at Kennedy Space Center, Florida in preparation for Thursday's launch.


You can see where ISS is right now!

NASA offers an online program called J-TRACK that can help you find the Space Station. This program shows you the location of ISS (and over 600 other satellites) at any given time. Click here.


Today's date is: This page was last updated: 7/12/2002 04:24 PM


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